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Anti-racism resources

13 Apr 2021 12:14 PM | Anonymous

Lesson Plan – Culture, Race and Ethnicity: Prepared for Harmony Week, this site provides definitions of the terms, and Questions for discussion: https://www.harmony.gov.au/get-involved/schools/lessonplans/lesson-plan-culture-race-ethnicity

9 Tips teachers can use when talking about racism: These are sensible tips and include once again the warning that “Teachers sometimes strive to teach about racism, without considering that it is the lived experience of some of their students”. https://theconversation.com/9-tips-teachers-can-use-when-talkingabout-racism-140837. “It’s important teachers don’t shy away from difficult conversations in the classroom, even if they may feel daunting.” – but we don’t want to re-traumatise anyone, so provide the usual names of groups to contact (e.g. Beyond Blue) From the Australian Human Rights Commission comes a compilation of resources from groups and sites like RacismNoWay and Difference Differently: https://itstopswithme, humanrights.gov.au/education-resources.

Lots of lesson plans and activities for Years 3-10. Uluru Statement from the Heart: https://ulurustatement.org/

Other References:

A recent Australian movie, High Ground, tells a fictionalised story of a massacre of Aborigines by police in the Northern Territory in the early 1900s, showing the story from both sides. However, according to The Conversation “Massacres at the hands of police and settlers were tragically common through northern Australia. The opening scene, depicting a massacre beside a waterhole in 1919, echoes the 1911 Gan Gan Massacre in which mounted police killed more than 30 Yolngu people in a “punishment expedition”. Find out the background at https://theconversation.com/how-historically-accurate-is-the-film-high-groundthe-violence-it-depicts-is-uncomfortably-close-to-the-truth-154475.

A recent Australian text by historian Mark McKenna, Return to Uluru, also depicts relationships between Aborigines and police. In 1934 a policeman killed an Aboriginal man, apparently in self-defence. However, a family member kept his diaries, which were given to McKenna. They told a different story, which has led to an example of what truth-telling and reconciliation look like in practice. See: https://www.readings.com.au/review/return-to-uluru-by-mark-mckenna#

Uluru Statement from the Heart: https://ulurustatement.org/

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